Verena Dietrich

Verena Dietrich

Wetzlar, Germany, 1941 · Schwerte, Germany, 2004

Höhenberg Sportspark Spectator Tribune
Cologne, Germany

This tribune reflects the architect’s passion for metallic materials and for their application to building. One of the most interesting features of this work is its attention to the alignment of shapes and structures which is reflected in recurring geometrical scheme.

Lucie Quirina Bakker

Lucie Quirina Bakker

Rotterdam, Netherlands, 1915 · Lochem, Netherlands, 2003

Quirina Tableware
Produced by Royal Tichelaar Ceramics Factory, Makkum, Netherlands

The Quirina Tableware is typical for the post-war transition from handcrafted pottery to serial production within the field of ceramics. Lucie Bakker turned from handicraft to serial production in the first place to earn a living.

Ursulina Witte Schüler

Ursulina Witte Schüler

Berlin, Germany, 1933

Tower Restaurant Steglitz
Berlin, Germany

Known locally as Bierpinsel (Beer Brush), it has three floors originally equipped with restaurants and a nightclub. It has a height of 46 m with a shape resembling that of an observation tower, but the architectural idea was that of a tree.

Sigrid Zschach Kressmann Losito

Sigrid Zschach Kressmann Losito

Leipzig, Germany, 1929 · Berlin, Germany, 1990

Steglitzer Kreisel
Berlin, Germany

The Steglitzer Kreisel is one of the largest office buildings of Berlin and also one of its most controversial landmarks. It became a symbol of the flawed speculative housing development projects of the 1960s and 1970s in West-Berlin during a time of housing shortage.

Anneliese (Anni) Fleischmann Albers

Anneliese (Anni) Fleischmann Albers

Charlottenburg (Berlin), Germany, 1899 · Orange (Connecticut), USA, 1994

Free-Hanging Room Divider
MoMA Museum of Modern Art, New York City, USA

This object is one of Albers-Fleischmann’s most experimental artefacts. Industrial textile production and abstract art are merged to form a functional furniture where the minimalist supporting structure and raw materials of the fabric provide aesthetic qualities.

Lilly Reich

Lilly Reich

Berlin, Germany, 1885 · 1947

Thonet Small Armchair
Produced by Thonet, Germany

The Thonet small armchair represents one of the most significant work in the fruitful career of Lilly Reich. This innovative piece of furniture epitomises Reich’s idea of interior design as a creative process in which art and technique are closely combined.

Ruth Hildegard Geyer-Raack

Ruth Hildegard Geyer-Raack

Nordhausen, Harz, Germany 1894 · Berlin, Germany 1975

Lady’s Living Room and Bedroom
Dame, Internationale Raumaustellung
Cologne, Germany

This living room and bedroom is the perfect combination of French Art Deco and German Bauhaus School. Curtains are used to define the space and divide the room if necessary in two separate places, having the living room as a social and public space, and the bedroom as a more private place.

Margarete (Grete) Heymann Marks Löbenstein

Margarete (Grete) Heymann Marks Löbenstein

Cologne, Germany, 1899 · London, United Kingdom, 1990

Tea Set
Glazed stoneware, produced by Haël Werkstätten für Künstlerische Keramik, Marwitz, Germany

The tea set, emblematic of a new Modernist language in mass produced objects, is the most iconic piece designed by Margarete Heymann (former Löbenstein and Marks), a German ceramic artist who trained at the Bauhaus, and manufactured by Haël Werkstätten, the factory she founded in 1923.

Marianne Liebe Brandt

Marianne Liebe Brandt

Chemnitz, Germany, 1893 · Kirchberg, Germany, 1983

Ashtray with Cigarette Holder
Produced by the Bauhaus Metal Workshop, Weimar
Bauhaus Archive – Museum of Design, Berlin

Liebe Brandt’s ashtray is one of the first objects produced at the Bauhaus’ metal workshop, where she was the only woman to have ever worked putting into practice the Bauhaus Weimar methodology of simplifying the design process for future mass-production.

Alma Buscher Siedhoff

Alma Buscher Siedhoff

Kreuztal, Germany, 1899 · Buchschlag, Germany, 1944

Toy Closet for the House am Horn Children’s-Room
Produced by the Bauhaus Woodcarving Workshop, Weimar
Klassik Stiftung, Bauhaus-Museum, Weimar

This toy closet is considered the first true demonstration of the Bauhaus’s modernist principles in furniture construction and epitomises Buscher’s belief in the potential of design-for-children to effect change in society at large.

Adelgunde Gunta Stölzl

Adelgunde (Gunta) Stölzl

Munich, Germany, 1897 · Küsnacht, Switzerland, 1983

Pillowcase
Produced by the Bauhaus Weaving Workshop, Weimar
Bauhaus-Archiv Museum, Berlin

This pillowcase epitomises Stölzl’s experimentation in designing aesthetically modern and functional daily life homeware textiles, characterised by raw materials and abstract patterns of multiple colours.