Tag Archives: Bauhaus

Alison Margaret Gill Smithson

Alison Margaret Gill Smithson

Sheffield, United Kingdom, 1928 · 1993

House of the Future
Daily Mail Ideal Home Exhibition at the Olympia Hall in West London, United Kingdom

It was exhibited as the prototype of the suburban house that would be built 25 years later and it highlighted the trust in technology in the 1950s. The house was a utopic project designed to be pre-manufactured in the line of car industry products.

Anneliese (Anni) Fleischmann Albers

Anneliese (Anni) Fleischmann Albers

Charlottenburg (Berlin), Germany, 1899 · Orange (Connecticut), USA, 1994

Free-Hanging Room Divider
MoMA Museum of Modern Art, New York City, USA

This object is one of Albers-Fleischmann’s most experimental artefacts. Industrial textile production and abstract art are merged to form a functional furniture where the minimalist supporting structure and raw materials of the fabric provide aesthetic qualities.

Lilly Reich

Lilly Reich

Berlin, Germany, 1885 · 1947

Thonet Small Armchair
Produced by Thonet, Germany

The Thonet small armchair represents one of the most significant work in the fruitful career of Lilly Reich. This innovative piece of furniture epitomises Reich’s idea of interior design as a creative process in which art and technique are closely combined.

Ruth Hildegard Geyer-Raack

Ruth Hildegard Geyer-Raack

Nordhausen, Harz, Germany 1894 · Berlin, Germany 1975

Lady’s Living Room and Bedroom
Dame, Internationale Raumaustellung
Cologne, Germany

This living room and bedroom is the perfect combination of French Art Deco and German Bauhaus School. Curtains are used to define the space and divide the room if necessary in two separate places, having the living room as a social and public space, and the bedroom as a more private place.

Margarete (Grete) Heymann Marks Löbenstein

Margarete (Grete) Heymann Marks Löbenstein

Cologne, Germany, 1899 · London, United Kingdom, 1990

Tea Set
Glazed stoneware, produced by Haël Werkstätten für Künstlerische Keramik, Marwitz, Germany

The tea set, emblematic of a new Modernist language in mass produced objects, is the most iconic piece designed by Margarete Heymann (former Löbenstein and Marks), a German ceramic artist who trained at the Bauhaus, and manufactured by Haël Werkstätten, the factory she founded in 1923.

Sylvia Gatt Stave

Sylvia Gatt Stave

Växjö, Sweden, 1908 · Paris, France, 1994

Cocktail Shaker
Produced by C.G. Hallbergs Guldsmedsaktiebolag, Stockholm
Nationalmuseum, Stockholm

This object is a significant example of the modern design that flowered between the two World Wars. Strongly influenced by the Bauhaus movement, Stave’s cocktail shaker represents a unicum of its kind.

Marianne Liebe Brandt

Marianne Liebe Brandt

Chemnitz, Germany, 1893 · Kirchberg, Germany, 1983

Ashtray with Cigarette Holder
Produced by the Bauhaus Metal Workshop, Weimar
Bauhaus Archive – Museum of Design, Berlin

Liebe Brandt’s ashtray is one of the first objects produced at the Bauhaus’ metal workshop, where she was the only woman to have ever worked putting into practice the Bauhaus Weimar methodology of simplifying the design process for future mass-production.

Alma Buscher Siedhoff

Alma Buscher Siedhoff

Kreuztal, Germany, 1899 · Buchschlag, Germany, 1944

Toy Closet for the House am Horn Children’s-Room
Produced by the Bauhaus Woodcarving Workshop, Weimar
Klassik Stiftung, Bauhaus-Museum, Weimar

This toy closet is considered the first true demonstration of the Bauhaus’s modernist principles in furniture construction and epitomises Buscher’s belief in the potential of design-for-children to effect change in society at large.

Adelgunde Gunta Stölzl

Adelgunde (Gunta) Stölzl

Munich, Germany, 1897 · Küsnacht, Switzerland, 1983

Pillowcase
Produced by the Bauhaus Weaving Workshop, Weimar
Bauhaus-Archiv Museum, Berlin

This pillowcase epitomises Stölzl’s experimentation in designing aesthetically modern and functional daily life homeware textiles, characterised by raw materials and abstract patterns of multiple colours.